Bariatrics-bob-25007

Which surgery is right for me?

Everyone's needs are different. That's why Salem Health offers two kinds of bariatric surgery:

Gastric bypass surgery

gastric-bypass-weight-loss-surgeryIn gastric bypass surgery (also called Roux-en-Y surgery), the stomach is divided into two sections. A pouch the size of a small egg is formed from the upper end of the stomach.

The amount of food a patient can eat is limited by the size of the pouch (about one ounce). This pouch is connected to the intestine without initially mixing with digestive juices in the remainder of the stomach.

The large part of the stomach that is left after the pouch is formed will still produce important digestive juices, so it is connected to the intestines below the other connection. This makes the “Y” shape that gives the procedure its technical name (Roux-en-Y). The absorption of calories takes place in the intestines below the “Y” connection.

Recovery 

If laparoscopic surgery is done, occasionally patients may need to wear an abdominal support binder. They should be able to return to work on “light duty,” (lifting up to 45 pounds) after two weeks, then resume regular work after about four weeks. If regular (open) surgery is done, light duty may be resumed after three weeks and it could take about six weeks to resume regular duties.

Sleeve gastrectomy surgery

sleevegastrectomy

Sleeve weight-loss surgery is also called a “laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy” or “gastric sleeve.” The surgeon makes about six small incisions in your abdomen and passes a tiny camera and other instruments to perform the surgery through these openings.

During sleeve weight-loss surgery, the surgeon will remove most (about 80 to 90 percent) of your stomach. This creates a much smaller tube-shaped stomach about the size and shape of a banana (holding about 5 to 7 ounces). This smaller stomach pouch fills with food quicker so that you feel full sooner.

Recovery

Patients typically lose about 60 percent of their excess body weigh over 12 to 18 months. Occasionally they may need to wear an abdominal support binder. They should be able to return to work on “light duty,” (lifting up to 45 pounds) after two weeks, then resume regular work at about four weeks.

Success stories

With the help of surgery and lifestyle changes, and with the support of the Salem Health team, they’ve accomplished their weight-loss goals. Read stories from our patients.